Category Archives: Tech

Holy $#!?, Adobe. What happened to you (Again…)?

Well, they pulled the update, but the damage is done: Never, ever, trust an update from Adobe.

I’ll admit, I’ve been out of the Adobe world for some time now. Once a die-hard fan of Photoshop, After Effects, Illustrator and, above all, Flash, I eventually soured on Adobe’s inability (or unwillingness) to fix longstanding bugs, its incessant feature creep and bloated software packages, and — the final nail — its insane monthly subscription model for its Creative Suite products.

I found amazing replacements for all these packages and technologies eventually, though, so yes, I quit paying attention to the company altogether about four years ago.

But I figure it’s worth mentioning last week’s utter sh!t-storm, which was caused by the company’s apparent notion that users would not possibly store files on their hard drives other than those sanctioned and/or created by Adobe itself. Somehow, an Adobe updater took it upon itself to >delete unknown files from the user’s root disk directory</strong> — without asking, and for no damned reason.

So glad I abandoned Adobe tools now. How the #@^! is it OK to delete user files, let alone root-level ones? That’s not just arrogance, Adobe; that borders on criminal negligence.

For more info on this act of idiocy by a company that long-ago burned the last ounce of trust I ever had in it, check out any of the following posts:

Full disclosure: Yes, I still use my licensed copy of CS 5.5, and it still seems to work. Creative Suite was once pretty impressive.

And… scene!

I removed the “Latest Adobe News” (formerly MXNA, Macromedia XML News Aggreator) feed from my own RSS feed today, which felt a little anticlimactic, considering how glued I used to be to the pulse of all things Flash/ActionScript. For the past several months, however, I have to admit I’ve barely glanced at it.

Who would have thought a few years ago that PHP, JavaScript and Objective-C would be my tools of choice eventually?

Thanks to the efforts of Laravel (PHP), JQuery/Angular/Node (Javascript) and Cocos2D/Cocoa (Objective-C) communities, those old-school technologies have truly become exciting over the past few years. Thanks to Adobe, however, Flash/Flex/ActionScript has become… I guess, limited at best.

Guess I could have just listened to my 2005 self.

Adobe says “You’re gonna need a bigger e-reader”

Those e-books you bought last year and never got around to reading? Better read ’em quick. The once-useful Adobe has plans for them…
Adobe burning books w/ its previous DRM

Why Turdhead has been mighty quiet lately

The fact that articles like this can be written without one’s tongue firmly planted in one’s cheek says a lot about how misguided and broken Adobe’s vision of the future seems today.

Momma always said, “If you can’t say something nice about someone, just don’t say anything.”

That pretty much sums up why Turdhead.com has been collecting cobwebs in recent years: After years of touting the virtues of Macromedia/Adobe Flash (even sponsoring an ActionScript Poetry contest and actively working to get support for the language into cross-language programming editors), I guess I decided I had nothing nice left to say about the product and company that once brought me so much joy, riches and enthusiasm.

I’ve been working a lot lately with Objective-C, HTML5 and JavaScript development (among other things, replacing a lot of now-legacy ActionScript code), and while it doesn’t thrill me in the way ActionScript did in its day, it’s not burdened with unfixed and compounding bugs such as those that live in the tools available from Adobe today.

That’s right: I’d rather float a <div> in IE6 than have to deal with Flash CSx’s penchant for crashing on save or Photoshop’s inability to respect its own preference settings.

Turdhead.com will eventually become useful again… but if you’re expecting more ActionScript/Flash love from this site, you may want to go ahead and remove it from your RSS feeds.

Thanks!

I love simple games. Apparently, you do too!

As the 2011 Game Developer Conference takes place this week, it’s interesting to see a return to basics in game design lately.

It’s hard not to notice that the iTunes App Store has brought something back into vogue that used to be a standard in the Flash games department: very simple games.

As the creator of silly, simple Flash games in the past, I must say I enjoy the heck out of such games. Doodle Jump and Angry Birds are just two of the insanely popular “one button” hits that have taken the stage in recent years, but the onslaught continues. Heck, our own Aquarium Adventure has even been reborn on the iOS platform (albeit with a little less gore than past versions).

And if you haven’t played Tiny Wings by Andreas Illiger on your iOS device yet, you really should. So simple it’s beautiful.